Community Regions and Rural Centers

Definitions according to the 2004 El Dorado County General Plan:

OBJECTIVE 2.1.1: COMMUNITY REGIONS
Purpose: The urban limit line establishes a line on the General Plan land use maps demarcating where the urban and suburban land uses will be developed. The Community Region boundaries as depicted on the General Plan land use map shall be the established urban limit line.

Provide opportunities that allow for continued population growth and economic expansion while preserving the character and extent of existing rural centers and urban communities, emphasizing both the natural setting and built design elements which contribute to the quality of life and economic health of the County.

Policy 2.1.1.1 The Communities within the County are identified as: Camino/Pollock Pines, El Dorado Hills, Cameron Park, El Dorado, Diamond Springs, Shingle Springs, and the City of Placerville and immediate surroundings.

Policy 2.1.1.2 Establish Community Regions to define those areas which are appropriate for the highest intensity of self-sustaining compact urban-type development or suburban type development within the County based on the municipal spheres of influence, availability of infrastructure, public services, major transportation corridors and travel patterns, the location of major topographic patterns and features, and the ability to provide and maintain appropriate transitions at Community Region boundaries. These boundaries shall be shown on the General Plan land use map.

Policy 2.1.1.3 Mixed use developments which combine commercial and residential uses in a single project are permissible and encouraged within Community Regions. Within Community Regions, the mixed-uses may occur vertically and/or horizontally. In mixed use projects, the maximum residential density shall be 16 dwelling units per acre within Community Regions. The residential component of a mixed use project may include a full range of single and/or multi family design concepts.

Policy 2.1.1.4 Community Region boundaries shall generally be coterminous with the Sphere of Influence boundaries of incorporated cities. Community Region boundaries may extend beyond a city’s sphere of influence to recognize existing and anticipated development patterns consistent with that of Community Regions. However, cities should be encouraged to expand their sphere of influence to be contiguous with Community Region boundaries.

Policy 2.1.1.5 intentionally blank

Policy 2.1.1.6 The boundaries of existing Community Regions may be modified through the General Plan amendment process.

Policy 2.1.1.7 Development within Community Regions, as with development elsewhere in the County, may proceed only in accordance with all applicable General Plan Policies, including those regarding infrastructure availability as set forth in the Transportation and Circulation and the Public Services and Utilities Elements. Accordingly, development in Community Regions and elsewhere will be limited in some cases until such time as adequate roadways, utilities, and other public service infrastructure become available and wildfire hazards are mitigated as required by an approved Fire Safe Plan.

Click on image to enlarge.  The red line around Shingle Springs is the Community Region Line (CRL).  Most of the land within the CRL is medium and low density land, which is one to ten acre parcels.

Most residents chose to live in Shingle Springs for its medium and low density residential lifestyle. We do not want to be the target for future high density development.  That is why we are requesting to have that line removed.  

If you like visuals, here is a link to a PowerPoint presentation with maps and more info:  https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B-OkT3JXTHXGbkdpdmtNcTBpSnM/edit.  Go to slide 28 for an explanation of the Community Region Line.

OBJECTIVE 2.1.2: RURAL CENTERS
Purpose: The urban limit line establishes a line on the General Plan land use maps demarcating where the urban and semi-urban land uses will be developed. The Rural Center boundaries as depicted on the General Plan land use map shall be the established urban limit line.

Recognize existing defined places as centers within the Rural Regions which provide a focus of activity and provides goods and services to the surrounding areas.

Policy 2.1.2.1 The Rural Centers within the County are identified as: Coloma, Cool, Fairplay, Garden Valley, Greenwood, Georgetown, Grey’s Corner, Grizzly Flat, Kelsey, Kyburz, Latrobe, Little Norway, Lotus, Mosquito, Mount Ralston, Mt. Aukum, Nashville, Oak Hill, Phillips, Pilot Hill, Pleasant Valley, Quintette, Rescue, Somerset, Strawberry, and Chrome Ridge.

Policy 2.1.2.2 Rural Center boundaries establish areas of higher intensity development throughout the rural areas of the County based on the availability of infrastructure, public services, existing uses, parcelization, impact on natural resources, etc. These boundaries shall be shown on the General Plan land use map.

Policy 2.1.2.3 To meet the commercial and service needs of the residents of the Rural Centers and Rural Regions, the predominant land use type within Rural Centers shall be commercial and higher density residential development.

Policy 2.1.2.4 Rural Centers shall be evaluated for their status as historic districts. The Historic Design combining zoning district shall be applied to each Rural Center which meets the criteria to conserve the unique historic character.

Policy 2.1.2.5 Mixed use developments which combine commercial and residential uses in a single project are permissible and encouraged within Rural Centers. Within Rural Centers, the mixed uses may occur either vertically and/or horizontally. The maximum residential density shall be four dwelling units per acre in Rural Centers in mixed use areas. The residential component of a mixed use project may include a full range of single and/or multi family design concepts.

Policy 2.1.2.6 The boundaries of existing Rural Centers may be modified through the General Plan amendment process.